THE NIGERIAN PROCLAMATION: MAKING A STATEMENT

Wednesday, May 30, 2007

My people, the Nigerian Proclamation was a great success. We, Nigerian bloggers, managed to respond to the recent Nigerian elections and get international recognition for our efforts. The BBC covered the Nigerian Proclamation project and shared the initiative with millions.

I must take this opportunity to thank all of you who participated in the project. Our unified action made the world take notice. Thank you to the many individuals who read the document, who posted the Nigerian Proclamation at their blogs, websites, MySpace pages and Facebook pages. Thank you, also, to those who shared the document with others via email. Thank you to those who voiced your commitment and supported the initiative.

Additionally, I must thank Omodudu whose pondering got me curious as to how Nigerians could make a statement and potentially have an impact on Nigerian politics. As we can all see, we did manage to make an impact.

Remember, the goal was and remains to provide a forum for Nigerians to collaborate on ensuring that the mistakes of the past do not become the mistakes of our future. In fact, I strongly believe that participating in this project was a patriotic act because one had to care about Nigeria to read the Proclamation and share it with others. This was not a mere exercise in 'Naija bashing'. This was a way for us, members of the Nigerian family, to express constructive criticism and hope for a brighter tomorrow.

There were some who objected to the initiative and questioned its relevancy. Your thoughts on the issue were important and contributed greatly to what needs to be an ongoing discourse on Nigeria and the various means to improving the country. Nonetheless, to those who challenged the Nigerian Proclamation project, I hope that you too will find a way to serve our country and that when you do, you will allow all of us to support you in that service.

A few bloggers are working on a new project that will again give Nigerian bloggers a tool to make a statement on the state of affairs in our great country. It will be a means to work together to improve our nation not solely through dialogue, but by action. I will be depending on you to once again join together and act as an undeniable and formidable force.

NIGERIA, WHERE MANY ARE ONE.

PS: We must all be thankful for the peaceful democratic transition. Please read President Yar'Adua's Inaugural Speech. I am still searching to find online video/sound of the speech, so once I do, I will post it. Finally, take the time to remember that 40 years ago, today marked the beginning of the Biafran War which spelt the beginning of death and suffering for many. We must never again allow dissension to strike such a chord in our hearts so as to unleash the violence and bloodshed that our people experienced then.


Related articles:
- The Nigerian Proclamation
- Epilogue: The Proclamation
:Nigerian Proclamation on BBC
- The Nigerian Proclamation: One Year
- 2 Years Later: Nigerian Proclamation

Read more!

NIGERIAN PROCLAMATION ON BBC

Tuesday, May 29, 2007

It appears that Nigerian bloggers made the world take notice. If you are yet to hear, please read 'Nigerian bloggers mount campaign'.

The article highlighted the Nigerian Proclamation project and provided a well defined report on the ongoing debate that it spurred amongst Nigerian bloggers.

It is not too late to read the Nigerian Proclamation and its Epilogue which provides insight into the origin of the Proclamation.


NIGERIA, WHERE MANY ARE ONE.


Related articles:
- The Nigerian Proclamation
- Epilogue: The Proclamation
- The Nigerian Proclamation: Making A Statement
- The Nigerian Proclamation: One Year
- 2 Years Later: Nigerian Proclamation


Read more!

THE NIGERIAN PROCLAMATION

IN RECENT HISTORY, NIGERIANS HAVE BEEN OVERWHELMINGLY BETRAYED BY THOSE CHARGED WITH ADDRESSING THEIR NEEDS. INSTEAD OF SERVING THE PEOPLE, PUBLIC SERVANTS HAVE SERVED THEMSELVES TO THE DETRIMENT OF THE MASSES. THE RESULT IS A NATION LACKING ADEQUATE INFRASTRUCTURE, ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY.

THE INEFFECTIVENESS OF NIGERIAN LEADERS INDICATES A LACK OF ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE CONSTITUENTS. NIGERIANS ARE NO LONGER RELEVANT TO THE LEADERS, THUS, LEADERS DO NOT FEEL RESPONSIBLE TO THEM.

THE RECENT FAILURE TO CONDUCT A FREE AND FAIR ELECTORAL PROCESS WAS YET ANOTHER ILLUSTRATION THAT THE NEEDS OF THE MANY ARE SECONDARY TO THE WANTS OF THE IMPORTANT FEW.

FROM THIS DAY, ALL NIGERIANS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FUTURE OF THIS GREAT & POWERFUL COUNTRY. CONSEQUENTLY, ALL NIGERIANS MUST COMMIT THEMSELVES TO THE FOLLOWING:

  1. WE MUST DEMAND THAT ELECTED OFFICIALS BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THEIR ACTIONS AND IN-ACTIONS.
  2. WE MUST EXPECT DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES TO BE HONORED, RESPECTED AND MAINTAINED.
  3. WE MUST BELIEVE THAT ALL NIGERIANS ARE EQUAL UNDER THE LAW AND SHOULD BE TREATED AS SUCH.
  4. WE MUST APPLY OURSELVES TO IMPROVING THE LOT OF EVERY INDIVIDUAL NIGERIAN REGARDLESS OF GENDER, RELIGION, TRIBE OR SOCIAL STATUS.
  5. WE MUST STRIVE TO MAINTAIN A UNITED REPUBLIC DESPITE OUR DIFFERENCES.

ONLY UPON ACHIEVING THESE PRINCIPLES CAN WE AS A PEOPLE FULLY LIVE UP TO OUR POTENTIAL AS A LAND OF GREATNESS. FOR OURS IS A COUNTRY RENOWNED FOR ITS ILLUSTRIOUS PEOPLE, AMPLE RESOURCES AND SHEER PHYSICAL BEAUTY.


Related articles:
- Epilogue: The Proclamation
- The Nigerian Proclamation: Making A Statement
- Nigerian Proclamation on BBC
- The Nigerian Proclamation: One Year
- 2 Years Later: Nigerian Proclamation

Read more!

EPILOGUE: THE PROCLAMATION

Tuesday, May 22, 2007

I write all the time, and have been doing so since I was old enough to hold a pencil. However, when I had to write something that I intended to be meaningful, inspiring and relevant, I faced the biggest challenge of my life. I realized that the act of putting words to paper, or in this case, screen, can actually be exceedingly difficult.

The difficulty arose in writing 'The Nigerian Proclamation'. My goal was to give myself and others a way to express their disappointment and frustrations over the recent Nigerian electoral process and the state of Nigerian affairs, in general. The 'Proclamation' was to be short and concise, yet inspirational. Being short and concise was not necessarily the problem. Although Nigeria is a large and complex nation, it is possible to address its issues in a condensed fashion. But to make one's writing relevant to others and inspirational enough to influence - that was the incredible challenge.

Although I have posted the 'Proclamation', I must admit that I feel that it is far from finished. The reasons for this are complex. First, even though I can condense my post, writing on Nigeria is still a difficult task, so figuring out which issues to focus on is arduous. I spent a lot of time being confused about what to discuss and feel that there are many other things that should have been mentioned.

Second, I wanted others to be able to use the 'Proclamation' to express symbolic protest against the recent electoral process and various failings exhibited by Nigeria. I thus visualized a profound document, a 'manifesto' of sorts. Unfortunately, the posted document still has a way to go before it ever achieves that status.

These are just a few of the issues I faced in writing 'The Nigerian Proclamation'. Despite the fact that I feel that the posted document is far from complete, I still believe that it is relevant as a symbolic response to my country's shortcomings. I thus can comfortably declare that the 'Proclamation' is a document I worked on tirelessly and consider it a work in progress. I hope to improve it and if you see room for constructive criticism, please feel free to share.

I also ask anyone reading this post to take the time to think of Nigeria and its people, particularly the disadvantaged. Local and International election observers have declared our democratic process a sham. If there is any truth to this, then it means that Nigerians were denied their democratic right to vote. If you are disappointed by that, and want Nigeria to improve, then please post the 'Proclamation' at your blog, MySpace page, Facebook page or any other place where you and your friends, regardless of their nationality, congregate. Feel free to also share the document via email with as many people you know. The goal is to ensure that we voice our disappointment and encourage improvement. The 'Proclamation' is simply a means to do so without resorting to other less desirable ways. The 'Proclamation' might not achieve immediate change, but it gives us all an opportunity to 'do something' and not just watch from the sidelines.

So scroll down to the next post and get your copy of The Nigerian Proclamation. But, before you do so, remind yourself of your duty to Nigeria by reading our nation's pledge.

The Nigerian Pledge

I pledge to Nigeria my country.
To be faithful, loyal, and honest.
To serve Nigeria with all my strength.
To defend her unity.
And uphold her honor and glory.
So help me God.


Related articles:
- The Nigerian Proclamation
- Epilogue: The Proclamation
- The Nigerian Proclamation: Making A Statement
- Nigerian Proclamation on BBC
- The Nigerian Proclamation: One Year
- 2 Years Later: Nigerian Proclamation

Read more!

THE NIGERIAN PROCLAMATION

Sunday, May 20, 2007

IN RECENT HISTORY, NIGERIANS HAVE BEEN OVERWHELMINGLY BETRAYED BY THOSE CHARGED WITH ADDRESSING THEIR NEEDS. INSTEAD OF SERVING THE PEOPLE, PUBLIC SERVANTS HAVE SERVED THEMSELVES TO THE DETRIMENT OF THE MASSES. THE RESULT IS A NATION LACKING ADEQUATE INFRASTRUCTURE, ORGANIZATION AND SECURITY.

THE INEFFECTIVENESS OF NIGERIAN LEADERS INDICATES A LACK OF ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE CONSTITUENTS. NIGERIANS ARE NO LONGER RELEVANT TO THE LEADERS, THUS, LEADERS DO NOT FEEL RESPONSIBLE TO THEM.

THE RECENT FAILURE TO CONDUCT A FREE AND FAIR ELECTORAL PROCESS WAS YET ANOTHER ILLUSTRATION THAT THE NEEDS OF THE MANY ARE SECONDARY TO THE WANTS OF THE IMPORTANT FEW.

FROM THIS DAY, ALL NIGERIANS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FUTURE OF THIS GREAT & POWERFUL COUNTRY. CONSEQUENTLY, ALL NIGERIANS MUST COMMIT THEMSELVES TO THE FOLLOWING:


  1. WE MUST DEMAND THAT ELECTED OFFICIALS BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR THEIR ACTIONS AND IN-ACTIONS.
  2. WE MUST EXPECT DEMOCRATIC PRINCIPLES TO BE HONORED, RESPECTED AND MAINTAINED.
  3. WE MUST BELIEVE THAT ALL NIGERIANS ARE EQUAL UNDER THE LAW AND SHOULD BE TREATED AS SUCH.
  4. WE MUST APPLY OURSELVES TO IMPROVING THE LOT OF EVERY INDIVIDUAL NIGERIAN REGARDLESS OF GENDER, RELIGION, TRIBE OR SOCIAL STATUS.
  5. WE MUST STRIVE TO MAINTAIN A UNITED REPUBLIC DESPITE OUR DIFFERENCES.

ONLY UPON ACHIEVING THESE PRINCIPLES CAN WE AS A PEOPLE FULLY LIVE UP TO OUR POTENTIAL AS A LAND OF GREATNESS. FOR OURS IS A COUNTRY RENOWNED FOR ITS ILLUSTRIOUS PEOPLE, AMPLE RESOURCES AND SHEER PHYSICAL BEAUTY.

Read more!

UPDATE: THE NIGERIAN BAR ASSOCIATION TO THE RESCUE

Friday, May 18, 2007

(Please scroll down for initial post or simply click here).

Well, the lawyers did their thing this Friday. Nigerian newspapers are reporting that NBA-led protest had an impact. Apparently, 88 branches of the group observed the one-day boycott. That "paralysed the inauguration of the election petition tribunal for Oyo State scheduled to hold in Ibadan..." (The Guardian).

According to the BBC, teams of lawyers were seen going from court house to court house to ensure that the boycott was enforced. Consequently, courts were unable to function.

The head of the NBA , Mr. Akinboro said, “NBA is not protesting against the results of the April elections, but it is protesting against the electoral processes leading to the results, beginning from the shoddy voter registration process to the eventual elections.”

I cannot express how glad I am to see that Nigerians are taking an opportunity to stand up for themselves and that the cause is being led by lawyers, no less. In fact, the Nigeria Labour Congress (NLC), Trade Union Congress (TUC) and other civil groups plan a protest by going on strike on May 29th.

I encourage all Nigerians to take a stand against the electoral process on May 29th. Get a copy of the Manifesto (right here at this blog) and place it on your blogs. Let us, together, send a message.

Read more!

ANNOUNCEMENT: MAKING A STATEMENT ON MAY 29TH

My people, our brother, Omodudu, recently noted that he wondered whether Nigerian bloggers could have an impact on our elections. Well, the elections have thankfully come and gone, but I still believe that we as a community of bloggers can still make a statement.

As such, I am drafting a short 'manifesto' that will be posted on day Tuesday for anyone that wants to then put it up on their blog or email it to friends. It is a statement reflecting our disappointment over the recent polls and expressing our expectations in the future.

I hope that you will participate in making a statement on the 29th. If you choose not to use the 'manifesto', please take that day to blog about Nigeria and please simply title your post NIGERIA.

So, my people, let us join together to show our rulers and leaders that we are watching, that they are accountable to the people and that we will not let them forget.

NIGERIA, WHERE MANY ARE ONE!

Read more!

CONTINUING VIOLENCE ....

Wednesday, May 16, 2007

I recently wrote about terrorism in Nigeria and the post elicited a good number of crucial comments and observations. Although I agree with all the commentators who were clear to state that Nigeria is not a land of terror, I can't help but be saddened and continuously worried by the growing violence that seems to have taken grip of the land.

The Bayelsa State residence of the Vice President-elect, Jonathan Goodluck, was partially destroyed by 'attackers'. No one knows who the attackers were exactly but, two police officers lost their lives in the attack. Mr. Goodluck was not in the house at the time of the attack, but his parents were. Thankfully, no one else was reported hurt or killed.

More acts of violence happened in Port Harcourt, Rivers State, where a young child was kidnapped from a wealthy neighborhood. Further information about this situation is unfortunately not easily available.

These and other violent acts continue to grow at an exponential rate. Those who carry them out are becoming ever more abrasive and extreme. This has definitely reinforced the notion that Nigeria lacks safety. The security crisis is a likely reason why big firms failed to participate in a recent auction of oil licenses. Of course that is not the only reason, the BBC speculates that there are concrete political reasons for the hesitancy, but nevertheless, it was and is a cause for concern. A reduction in foreign direct investment will not help Nigeria, in my opinion. Such a slow down will negatively impact both the official and unofficial economies upon which all Nigerians depend for income in one way or the other. Who will suffer the most? The poor - that is 90% of the country. That will only make people more desperate and incite further violence and death.

And now, opposition parties have "vowed to physically stop the inauguration of Alhaji Umaru Yar'Adua as the next President vowing to enthrone an interim government from May 29." I am unsure how they plan to achieve this feat, but the sense of elation I felt after the elections (because bloodshed was less than I expected and the Republic was still standing, despite my fears) is quickly ebbing away. I am desperately hoping that things go well for Nigerians and Nigeria. History suggests that it will. After all, we have overcome many an obstacle. But, I fear that violence will continue to escalate until we provide a means for the average person to provide for himself and his family without resorting to corruption or physical acts of violence. Until that day comes, my people, we must not sleep easy.

Read more!

THE NIGERIAN BAR ASSOCIATION TO THE RESCUE

Monday, May 14, 2007

Lawyers always get a bad rap. They are frequently called cheats, liars, and almost any bad word you can think of under the sun. Despite the bad reputation, Nigerian lawyers and the Judiciary in particular have been exemplary during the political election fiasco. These actions buck the stereotype that lawyers are bad. I noted that the Nigerian Bar Association (NBA) intervened by advising INEC to stay out of pre-election legal cases. Additionally, other writers have decidedly giving the Judiciary a 'thumbs up' for its ability to remain unbiased and avoid becoming a 'tool' during the election process. Check out Imnakoya's article for his thoughts on the importance of the Judiciary, as an example.

I have always been proud to be a lawyer because despite the reputation, lawyers have historically been crucial in social change all over the world. Nevertheless, I was never prouder to be a lawyer than when I read that the NBA will be protesting the election results. According to the Champion newspaper, the organization believes that the recent election process undermined democratic progress. The NBA president, Mr. Abgbakoba, stated,

"As far as we are concerned, there was [sic] no election in Nigeria. This same flaws [sic] happened in 1993, and thousands of people were killed as a result, same was the case in 1999 and 2003. This is 2007 and if we do not put a check to it now, then it would become a norm and trend which will continue to trail our
transition programmes..."


The planned protest is meant to be symbolic and it is supported by the West African Bar Association. Both are appealing the Court of Appeals to declare that the presidential tribunal begin forthwith.

Considering the fact that attempts to protest by ordinary Nigerians were stalled by armed police officers and military officers and the uncooperative weather on May 1st, it is wonderful to see that other Nigerians are willing to stand up to the challenge of informing the government (both OBJ's and Yar'Adua's soon-to-be administration) that they were disappointed in the election process. Donzman recently commented on this blog that Nigeria's civil society is non-existent. I hope that this and other actions on behalf of courageous Nigerians will help to prove him wrong and change his opinion on the Nigerian spirit and its fortitude to withstand the domination of bullies and oppressors.


PS. There will be a special announcement on Friday the 18th about May 29th....

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HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY

Sunday, May 13, 2007



Nigerian women protesting the recent elections outside INEC headquarters in Abuja this week.


Source: Sahara Reporters.

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AND THEY'RE OFF....

Thursday, May 10, 2007

To court, that is.

Buhari, Atiku and Olapade Agoro (all presidential candidates that lost to Yar'Adua in the election) have approached the Court of Appeals in an attempt to review materials used by INEC to conduct the election.

The cases were presented by each individual separately and each is based on Section 239 of the Constitution which grants the Court of Appeals jurisdiction over any issue as to whether "[a]ny person has been validly elected to the office of President or Vice President..."

The Vanguard newspaper reports that the men seek to inspect "all the ballot boxes and papers used on the election day; various result sheets entered by party agents, INEC’s returning officers, tabulation and collation sheets used before announcing the results among other things".

This action is seen as an attempt to get the necessary information and evidence that the plaintiffs will then present at a tribunal challenging the presidential elections. Buhari, Atiku, Agoro and all other possible challengers might get further ammunition duirectly from INEC. It appears an INEC official informed ThisDay newspaper about polling irregularities during the state elections. According to ThisDay, INEC has categorized Sokoto state as having the highest number of electoral malpractices. It is followed by Gombe, Ondo, Oyo, Osun, Ogun, Katsina and Kano States. In fact, INEC will be prosecuting the governor of Ondo State for 'hijacking' the ballots.

Assuming INEC is setting precedent and that it will be consistent, challengers of the presidential election will probably get additional information regarding presidential election malpractices to use in their case at the tribunal.

No one assumes that the results of the election will be overturned on account of the tribunals ruling, however, it is the process that counts. The court cases, the tribunal to review the presidential election, INEC's review of election malfeasance and all the many actions that result will set an example on how to review elections in Nigeria and hopefully contribute to a sense that people can and will be held accountable for malpractices against the Nigerian people and their right to vote. Maybe that might help ensure less election magomago (i.e. rigging) in the future. Well, one can hope anyway.

Read more!

IS NIGERIA A BREEDING GROUND FOR TERRORISM?

Saturday, May 5, 2007

* This post has been updated with news and analysis of the 'Nigerian Terrorist' incident from December 25th, 2009 in "A Nigerian Terrorist & A Nation's Passivity". Please read that post after this one. Thank you.


When most people think of terrorists, you think of a scary dude in military-like gear/ fatigues/ black clothing, face covered, brandished gun in hand and ammunition around his chest. And, of course, you think, right or wrong, of an Arab male.

Well, a funny thing happened a few days ago while I was watching CNN. The commentator announced that 172 terrorists had been captured in Saudi Arabia. Being that I once worked a few blocks from the World Trade Center in NYC and lived walking distance from the White House on September 11th, 2001 and can still remember military aircrafts circulating my neighborhood after the plane went into the Pentagon, roughly 10 miles away, I paid close attention and wanted to learn more about this capture of terrorists.

The commentator didn't say much, but not less than 20 minutes later, some information scrolled across the bottom of the screen. CNN reported that some of the captured terrorists were Yemeni and NIGERIAN. How is that possible? Nigerians are the 'happiest people' on earth, right? Since when did we start doing terrorism? I thought CNN must have misreported and committed myself to paying more attention to the story.
I never again saw any reference to Nigerian involvement in the captured terrorist cell on CNN or any other news outlet this side of the Atlantic. I managed to convince myself that I misread the scroll bar and couldn't possibly have seen what I thought I saw.

Lack of sleep, a few days later, and curiosity, however, set me on a hunt to find some more info and so I started digging. I looked at some of my favorite Nigeria-related blogs, Naija Blog, Omodudu, Chippla, Grandiose Parlor, but I failed to find what I was looking for. Nobody else saw what I saw, it seemed. A simple search on Google, however, pulled up what I was looking for. My eyes had not deceived me. At least 3 of the first 100 websites found made a brief mention of Nigerians being part of the group of captured terrorists. This news came out April 29th. I wonder why more details are hard to find? What is one to make of this Naija connection? Is it real or fabricated?

In light of the recent failed attempt to blow up INEC headquarters in Abuja (in broad day light, while it was surrounded by stragglers, protesters and other businesses on a busy Abuja street), the continuous kidnapping and capturing of foreign workers in the Niger Delta region and now the newest strategy of kidnapping relatives of 'relevant' politicians, such as a governors mother (God have mercy on MEND), I am beginning to wonder just how happy Nigerians really are. It seems that disenfranchisement, the lack of jobs, inadequate resources and non-existing infrastructure seems to have turned a happy-go lucky people into desperate individuals willing to resort to violence to get their point across.

The disenfranchised are using whatever means necessary to hit the Big Boys where it hurts. The 'means' - violence and militarism. 'Where it hurts' - the pocket. Thus, groups like MEND attack the Nigeria's oil production system in an effort to voice their concerns and hopefully influence decisions and outcomes.

Rather than use preventative action, a 'tear-tear/patch-patch' approach is applied by government. Preventative action would be to provide better living conditions in the Niger Delta and all over Nigeria via the better health care, schools, affordable housing, business and job opportunities etc. Instead, the 'tear-tear/patch-patch' approach means that the government uses police intimidation and soldiers to quash any attempts to protest or question the miserable living conditions and incredible incompetence of our 'leaders'. Consequently, by failing to address the issues of the common man, Nigeria continues to breed discontented individuals who can also be easily influenced into joining up with hard-core terrorists and thus get captured in Saudi Arabia or join groups like MEND in the Delta.

If Nigerian terrorists do not yet exist, I posit that the current conditions are enough to encourage the onslaught of terrorists in the near future. There are approximately 140 million Nigerians, with the overwhelming majority of them living below $1 a day. We do not need a generation of discontented Nigerians attacking fellow Nigerians or people from any other part of the globe. Nigeria can be called many things. One thing it MUST NOT be called is a breeding ground for terrorism.

We need to take care of our people and thus prevent the conditions that foster militarism, violence and terrorism. If not, we could be in for a bleak future, indeed.


Related Articles of Interest:
- Nigeria's President Absent During Crisis
- Nigeria Placed on "Terror Prone" List
- African Travel Post Abdulmutallab
- A Nigerian Terrorist & A People's Passivity
- 'Is Nigeria A Breeding Ground For Terrorism' (May 2007)
- America Speaks...Does Nigeria Respond?
- How to Shoot Yourself in the Foot With Al Qaeda

Read more!

THE 3RD ANNUAL CELEBRATING AFRICAN MOTHERHOOD SOIREE

Friday, May 4, 2007

I thought I would share information on this wonderful event that is just around the corner - May 12th.

AN EVENT FOR SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS AND FABULOUSLY CHIC AFROPOLITANS!!

The Celebrating African Motherhood (CAM) organization honors outstanding women of African descent who have impacted the community artistically, socially, and politically. Our 3rd annual CAM soiree (benefiting Africare) is on the eve of Mother's Day & will be hosted by Shawn Yancy of Fox 5 News. Pre and post coverage by Miss Alimatu Garuba, Miss Nigeria in USA'06. Please visit our website for program details and pictures of last years soiree: http://www.camotherhood.org/news.html

Celebrating African Motherhood (CAM) Hosts 3rd Annual Soiree THEME: "HONORING AFRICAN WOMEN IN THE ARTS" BENEFICIARY: Africare's Women's Initiative for Sex Education (WISE) Project
When: Saturday, May 12, 2007 6:00PM-10:00PM ET
Where: The Madison Hotel 1177 Fifteenth St. NW, Washington, DC 20005
HOST: Shawn Yancy, Fox 5 News
This year's CAM soiree focuses on women in the arts and honors:. Angelique Kidjoe, Benin: 4x Grammy Award Nominee & Children's Right Advocate.
Regina Askia, Nigeria: Former Miss Nigeria & International Actress. Raynor van der Merwe, South Africa: Artistic Director of ETAP.
Afua Sam, Ghana: Haute Couture Designer, Studio D-Maxsi..

Highlights of the evening include lavish cuisine, uniquely themed drinks, breathtaking opera & cultural performances, live music, deluxe raffle drawing and more.

Ms. Nicole Lee of Transafrica Forum is scheduled to Keynote the event.



Hope to see you there!!!!!

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BIG MEN, BIG FRAUD, BIG TROUBLE

Wednesday, May 2, 2007

"It is totally false to suggest that Nigerians are fundamentally different from any other people in the world. Nigerians are corrupt because the system under which they live today makes corruption easy and profitable; they will cease to be corrupt when corruption is made difficult and inconvenient. The trouble with Nigeria is simply and squarely a failure of leadership."

Chinua Achebe, 24 years ago.

Source: The Economist - Big Men, Big Fraud and Big Trouble

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